MR KHAN

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Dear Mr Khan

Do not hate me

For the crimes

Of my father

 

I am not a believer

In anything

Furthermore

I have never

Stolen from you

Enslaved you

Derided you

 

It is just that your God

The one you share

With Christians

And Jews

The God of Abraham

Of Ibrahim

Same difference

Or any God

For that matter

Is irrelevant

To me

Unlike my father

British Raj

Who in the name

Of God

Took you to

The cleaners

 

May peace be with you

And yours

Always

 

Sincerely

MS

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12 thoughts on “MR KHAN

    1. Thank for the comment. The reason I enjoy your blog so very much is that you are so very positive. I am an aging gentle atheist yet have many Christian friends. The skill of life is that we all get on – and importantly get on with each other. Respect is what it is all about and you, from what I have read, have that in shed loads. Good luck to you young lady!

    1. Not in a ‘crusading’ way. We had one religion they had another and we, as the effective conquerors, saw no need to find common ground and it is from there I believe that modern day contempt between Islam and Christianity ‘kicked off.’ The seeds were sown for the radicals to eventually commit foul, evil deeds when maybe us Brits could have shown a little compassion and said ‘sorry.’

      1. Interesting – I wrote a few unpublished lines some years ago that may hearken to that very same seed:

        90 Year Old Reflections on Jihad

        In reading a novel that was originally published in 1916, I came across a passage that seems remarkable in light of our modern struggle against Islamic terrorism.

        “We have laughed at the Holy War, the Jehad. Islam is a fighting creed, and the mullah still stands in the pulpit with the Koran in one hand and a drawn sword in the other. Which thing will madden the remotest Moslem peasant with dreams of Paradise?”

        The novel is Greenmantle by John Buchan.

      2. Fascinating. Thank you for sending me those lines. Bottom line is from my perspective is that we Brits turned that which was easily turned. Revenge, to a few is seen as payback for the crimes of the fathers of this once ‘powerful’ as opposed to ‘great’ nation. That is a fabulous observation by Buchan though.

  1. It’s strange, isn’t it, the barriers we set up with our fellows, in the name of belief?

    Beautiful, this.

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